What are Terpenoids

Difference Between Terpenes and Terpenoids
A terpene is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon based on combinations of the isoprene unit. Terpenoids are compounds related to terpenes, which may include some oxygen functionality or some rearrangement, however the two terms are often used interchangeably.

Linalool is simple terpene alcohol. Linalool has been isolated in several hundred different plants. The Lamiaceae plant and herb family, which includes mints and other scented herbs, is a common source. The Lauraceae plant family, which includes laurels, cinnamon, and rosewood, is also a readily available source. The Rutaceae family, which contains citrus plants, is another viable source. Birch trees and several different plant species that are found in tropical and boreal climate zones also produce linalool. Although technically not plants, some fungi produce linalool, as well. The Environmental Protection Agency has approved its use as a pesticide, flavor agent and scent. Linalool is used in a wide variety of bath and body products and is commonly listed under ingredients for these products as beta linalool, linalyl alcohol, linaloyl oxide, p-linalool and alloocimenol. Its vapors have been shown to be an effective insecticide against fruit flies, fleas and cockroaches.

Linalool reverses the histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s Disease and restores cognitive and emotional functions via an anti-inflammatory effect. Studies also suggest linalool can significantly reduce lung inflammation caused by cigarette smoke. Linalool is a critical precursor in the formation of Vitamin E. It has also been used in the treatment of both psychosis and anxiety, and as an anti-epileptic agent.

Linalool is a non-cyclic monoterpenoid and has been described as having floral and lavender undertones. Varieties high in linalool promote calming, relaxing effects.

Linalool has been used for centuries as a sleep aid. Linalool lessens the anxious emotions provoked by pure THC, thus making it helpful in the treatment of both psychosis and anxiety. Studies also suggest that linalool boosts the immune system; can significantly reduce lung inflammation; and can restore cognitive and emotional function (making it useful in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease).

As shown by the Ma, J., Xu et al study, linalool may significantly reduce lung inflammation caused by cigarette smoke by blocking the carcinogenesis induced by benz[α]anthracene, a component of the tar generated by the combustion of tobacco. This finding indicates limonene may be helpful in reducing the harm caused by inhaling cannabis smoke.

Linalool boosts the immune system as it directly activates immune cells through specific receptors and/or pathways. The Sabogal-Guáqueta et al study suggests linalool may reverse the histopathological (the microscopic examination of biological tissues to observe the appearance of diseased cells and tissues in very fine detail) hallmarks of Alzheimer’s Disease and could restore cognitive and emotional functions via an anti-inflammatory effect.

The Environmental Protection Agency has approved its use as a pesticide, flavor agent and scent. It is used in a wide variety of bath and body products and is commonly listed under ingredients for these products as beta linalool, linalyl alcohol, linaloyl oxide, p-linalool and alloocimenol. Its vapors have been shown to be an effective insecticide against fruit flies, fleas and cockroaches.

Linalool has been isolated in several hundred different plants. The Lamiaceae plant and herb family, which includes mints and other scented herbs, are common sources. The Lauraceae plant family, which includes laurels, cinnamon, and rosewood, is also a readily available source. The Rutaceae family, which contains citrus plants, is another viable source. Birch trees and several different plant species that are found in tropical and boreal climate zones also produce linalool. Although technically not plants, some fungi produce linalool, as well. Linalool is a critical precursor in the formation of Vitamin E.

LINALOOL

Linalool is a colorless liquid with a sweet and soft odor. The odor is only detectable when molecules are mixed with gas or air. This makes them volatile so that the smell receptors in the nose can be activated. It usually occurs naturally in many essential oils like spearmint, rose, lemon, cinnamon, ylang-ylang, and tangerine. Linalool has a soft, sweet scent.
There are different sources of natural linalool. It is usually found in many plants like 200 plants. The common sources include Lamiaceae plants and herb family like mints and other scented herb. Linalool is present in two major stereogenic forms that occur naturally. This means that chemicals are mirrored copies in term of their composition. The two forms are known as coriandrol and lecareol. Coriandrol is a form of linalool commonly found in plants. It can be found in coriander seeds which are used in the production of essential oils. Licareol, on the other hand, is a form of linalool found in plant sources such as lavender, sweet basil, and laurel. This form is generally very useful a scent agent in different products. Human responds to different scents. The licareol has a woody lavender scent while coriandrol has a sweet floral scent.

There are several ways that linalool can be used. Hygienic products often have this liquid in them that act as a scent agent. It is commonly used as a perfume in a variety of soaps, shampoo, lotions, sanitary pads and detergents that usually have sweet or minty floral scent in them.
The insecticides produced from linalool are very useful for controlling cockroaches and fleas. This is because it is non-toxic to humans and animals, thus it is very useful alternatives to toxic insecticides. Thus the insecticide can be placed anywhere without the fear of hurting animals.
Vitamin E is a common by-product of linalool production. Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin that the body uses in different ways. It reduces the visual effects of aging by moisturizing scars heal.

Linalool is generally safe. However, people with eczema condition have chances of having adverse reactions if they come into contact with linalool. This is because it reacts with oxygen and exposure can cause this condition to flare up. The only way to stop these reactions is to minimize exposure to these products. Also, these people can prevent oxidizing of linalool by buying smaller containers of products that contain this liquid and to replace the lid after using the product.